An Anti-Aging Pill? Think Twice

The diabetes drug metformin, sometimes taken to slow aging, may blunt the health benefits of exercise. By Gretchen Reynolds A popular diabetes drug sometimes is taken to slow aging may diminish some of the expected health benefits of aerobic exercise in healthy older adults, according to a new report. The drug, metformin, can blunt certain physical changes from exercise that normally help people to age well. The results raise questions about the relationship between pills and physical activity in healthy aging and also…

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They Won’t Kill You but They Sure Make You Miserable

8 of the Most Painful Medical Conditions A roundup of the top agony-inducing ailments, and new ways to find relief by Lisa Haney, AARP, February 8, 2019  It started with a persistent jaw ache. Eileen R., a grant writer in Dallas, had gone to several dentists, who suggested the cause was a bad tooth or, perhaps, temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ). But none could pinpoint the source of her discomfort. When she mentioned the migraine headaches she was also getting, a dentist referred her…

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After a Hip Fracture, Reducing the Risk of a Recurrence

By Jane E. Brody . New York Times April 15, 2019 Following a fracture, patients should have a bone density test, evaluation of calcium and vitamin   D levels and, in nearly all cases, medication to protect against further bone loss. Just as lightning can strike the same target more than once in a given storm, hip fractures can and do happen again to the same person. Yet, more often than not, people who fracture a hip do not get follow-up treatment that…

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Wake up, people: You’re fooling yourself about sleep, study says

By Sandee LaMotte, CNN . April 17, 2019 https://www.cnn.com/interactive/2017/07/health/parallels/sleep/ Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health's School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. "There's such a link between good sleep and our waking success," said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health.…

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Emojis with Disabilities Coming to a Phone

  The Unicode Consortium — the organization that oversees emojis released 59 new emojis last week. Among them are numerous images portraying various aspects of the disability experience. The new ideograms include people using a hearing aid, sign language, wheelchairs, a service dog, and prosthetics, as well as other special needs. Some of the emoji have male and female versions and variants for skin tone. Unicode said that the newest icons are likely to become available in September or October. The new…

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Clear up confusion surrounding observation services and admission into hospitals/ Your rights?

Kaiser Health News - Susan Jaffe How do I know what my hospital status is?  Ask your doctor or other hospital officials if you are in the hospital for observation or as a regular inpatient. If you are an observation patient, ask why. Even if you are admitted as an inpatient, the hospital can switch you to observation status; in that case, the hospital is required to notify you. If you do not have three consecutive days of hospitalization as an inpatient…

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CBD Is Everywhere, but Scientists Still Don’t Know Much About It

By Roni Caryn Rabin Cannabidiol, or CBD, a nonintoxicating component of the marijuana plant, is touted as a magic bullet that eases pain, anxiety, insomnia and depression. Salves, sprays, tinctures and oils containing CBD are marketed as aphrodisiacs that boost desire; as balms for eczema, pimples and hot flashes; and even as treatments for serious diseases like diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Unlike THC or tetrahydrocannabinol, the “psychoactive” component of the cannabis plant, CBD won’t get you “high.” But scientists know little about what…

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The Case Against Cough Medicine

The evidence is sorely lacking for the value of any over-the-counter remedy to treat most coughs. by Jane E. Brody /NYTimes/ 02/20/2019 On a South American trip last month with two of my grandsons, the younger — 14-year-old Tennyson — developed a cough. He had no fever, congestion or fatigue, said he felt fine, ate and slept normally and stayed well-hydrated. But eight days later, after watching a live raptor show for 90 minutes in freezing winds, his cough was noticeably worse.…

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Awake on the Table

By Kate Johnson NYTimes 01/30/2019 Could a medical procedure you don’t even remember give you a stress disorder? The doctor ordered a “push” on my sedative, and I succumbed to the sweet blackness. But then something went wrong, and I was awake too soon, flailing and crying, the medical team scrambling to maneuver the tube that had been placed down my throat in what should have been a straightforward gastroscopy. I put up a violent struggle on the table: gagging and choking, trying…

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